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Aussie Feds target computer forensics

Thursday, March 31, 2005 (14:35:32)
Australia's hi-tech crime squad has vowed to change the perception of the internet as an anonymous haven to one where users are not as nameless as they might think. At a three-day computer forensics workshop in Canberra Federal Police Australian High Tech Crime Centre (AHTCC) chief Kevin Zuccato said as bank fraud, CP and identity theft became more sophisticated, law enforcement agencies were equally drawing on more sophisticated crime fighting tools...

More (Australian IT)

Net fingerprints combat attacks

Wednesday, March 30, 2005 (11:59:03)
Eighty large net service firms have switched on software to spot and stop net attacks automatically. The system creates digital fingerprints of ongoing incidents that are sent to every network affected. Firms involved in the smart sensing system believe it will help trace attacks back to their source. Data gathered will be passed to police to help build up intelligence about who is behind worm outbreaks and denial of service attacks...

More (BBC)

Jeff Weise's e-mail trail led authorities to Jourdain

Wednesday, March 30, 2005 (11:44:25)
It's hard to cover your tracks on your computer. Deleted files aren't immediately deleted. And software programs on most PCs keep all sorts of data trails, recording the Web sites you visit, the pictures you look at, the e-mails you exchange, and much more. That is why probing the computers of suspects has become a routine part of criminal investigations, whether they deal with corporate misdeeds or mass murder. It's believed e-mails recovered from a computer used by Jeff Weise, who fatally shot nine people before killing himself March 21, led authorities to arrest Louis Jourdain, 16, on Sunday...

More (Pioneer Press)

Online CP investigation costs UK police £15m

Tuesday, March 29, 2005 (09:22:01)
The cost of forensically examining the computers seized during the UK police's Operation Ore investigation into online CP will total £15m, according to the National Crime Squad (NCS). Operation Ore was launched after the FBI smashed an illegal CP ring in the US. The FBI passed UK police a list containing the details of over 7,000 UK citizens who had given their credit card details to gain access to CP websites run by the gang...

More (Silicon.com)

EnCase Forensic Version 5 now available

Monday, March 28, 2005 (22:17:18)
V5 resources from Guidance available at

http://www.guidancesoftware.com/v4tov5.shtm

Expert rejects Lundy evidence

Monday, March 28, 2005 (14:34:39)
A computer forensics expert who has spent up to 400 hours examining evidence in the Mark Lundy murder case says he has ruled out police claims that Lundy manipulated a computer clock to give himself an alibi. The Crown at Lundy's trial in 2002 claimed that after murdering his wife Christine and daughter Amber in their Palmerston North home, Lundy tampered with the clock to make it appear the computer was shut down at 10.52pm - when he was 150km away in Petone...

More (Stuff)

Can computers survive cross-examination?

Saturday, March 26, 2005 (12:13:06)
Between my fingers typing these words and the Word application which records them there is a huge range of different programs, not all of which I know intimately. If even a simple document such as this is potentially affected by unknown sequences of instructions, then what of a more important document relevant to a criminal prosecution? How sure can we be that the evidence of guilt contained on a computer should be relied upon?

More (ZDNet)

UK MP to raise bill to boost computer crime laws

Friday, March 25, 2005 (11:54:05)
Derek Wyatt, chairman of the All Party Internet Group, is to raise a 10 minute rule bill in the Commons next month calling for the Computer Misuse Act to be strengthened. The move follows a campaign by Computer Weekly, businesses and IT security professionals to increase sentencing for offenders and tighten the act's provisions against denial of service attacks.

From (ComputerWeekly.com)

Super Resolution: Making the invisible visible

Thursday, March 24, 2005 (15:09:20)
Intel is developing a technology that promises to uncover hidden information in digital images and videos and create output files of significantly higher resolution and quality. "Super Resolution" (SR) consumes enormous computing resources, but is on track to reduce the bandwidth required to transmit video files and automatically enhance digital pictures sometime in the future...

More (Tom's Hardware Guide)

Judge in Jackson trial: Computer images inadmissible

Thursday, March 24, 2005 (11:37:30)
Computers seized from Michael Jackson's bedroom and containing stored images of naked women from adult Web sites are not admissible at the singer's child-molestation trial, Superior Court Judge Rodney Melville ruled Wednesday. Melville said he barred the materials because it was unclear if anyone actually viewed or downloaded the images that were stored on four computer hard drives. In arguing to bar the material, defense attorney Robert Sanger said that the origins of the images were murky. For example, Sanger said they could have been sent as an unsolicited e-mail before landing in the computers' "cache" file. Sanger added that it was unclear if Jackson himself had used the computer. "The issue of who accessed the material is totally unresolved," he said...

More (SantaMariaTimes.com)