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Search on This Topic: News

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Computer forensic experts to track copied Clio e-mails

Monday, September 05, 2005 (15:07:51)
The [Clio] Board of Education voted unanimously Monday to hire a computer forensics company to investigate e-mail tampering in the district. Board members said they hope the investigation by Southfield-based Center for Computer Forensics reveals who has gained access to the e-mails of Assistant School Superintendent Fletcher Spears and if administrators have made statements via e-mail about parents that could leave school officials legally vulnerable...

More (mlive.com)

Forensics is not just a word for cops

Thursday, September 01, 2005 (03:08:42)
Last year, two employees of AdvantaCare Health Partners resigned and launched their own start-up. Prior to leaving, they copied patient databases, confidential business plans, and other trade secrets, and used this information to compete with AdvantaCare. Before leaving, they tried to conceal what they had done by deleting copied files. This case, which is common at companies with valued intellectual property (IP), was resolved through computer forensics. With IP theft, or compromised customer privacy data stored electronically, an effective computer forensics examination will identify those responsible...

More (SC Magazine)

Group honors high-tech work on BTK

Friday, August 26, 2005 (12:33:16)
A Wichita police detective who helped solve the BTK murder cases has won an international crime investigation award. Detective Randy Stone, whose computer sleuthing provided a turning point in the hunt for BTK, will be given an award for "forensics investigation case of the year" by the International High Technology Crime Investigation Association next week at its conference in Monterey, Calif. The association is also presenting an award to the Wichita Police Department's computer crimes lab as a whole, and another award to the FBI's regional computer forensic laboratory in Kansas City, Mo., for its work on the BTK case...

More (Kansas.com)

Storm brewing over SHA-1 as further breaks are found

Friday, August 26, 2005 (02:27:09)
Three Chinese researchers have further refined an attack on the encryption standard frequently used to digitally sign documents, making the attack 64 times faster and leaving cryptographers to debate whether the standard, known as the Secure Hash Algorithm, should be phased out more quickly than planned. The attack, presented last week at the Crypto conference in Santa Barbara, Calif., would allow a forger to create two documents that return the same digital fingerprint, a short sequence of numbers that represent the contents of a much larger document...

More (SecurityFocus)

Computer Forensics and Its Impact on Employment Litigation

Thursday, August 25, 2005 (14:04:36)
Computer forensics is becoming a routine part of many employment cases. To cite a few recent examples handled by our firm: After a key employee suddenly resigned, the employer hired a computer forensics company to search the hard drive of the employee's work computer. The search uncovered in "unallocated space" (the place where files go when they are deleted) a business plan that described in detail how he was planning to compete with the employer once he left, including a detailed section on how the employer's biggest client would become his own...

More (RJ&L LLP)

New forensic software released

Monday, August 22, 2005 (14:02:32)
With a raft of bogus bank Web sites and phishing scams flooding computers, it would appear that crime has gone dotcom like everything else. However, a new forensic tool has stepped into the computer crime scene to help search, not a suspect's home, but his hard drive for evidence. Friday saw the release of the Digital Evidence Search Kit (DESK), a computer forensic search tool designed by the Hong Kong University in collaboration with the police...

More (The Standard)

Messages of fear in hi-tech invisible ink

Sunday, August 21, 2005 (20:20:38)
The first sign that something was amiss came a few days before Christmas Eve 2003. The US department of homeland security raised the national terror alert level to "high risk". The move triggered a ripple of concern throughout the airline industry and nearly 30 flights were grounded, including long hauls between Paris and Los Angeles and subsequently London and Washington. But in recent weeks, US officials have made a startling admission: the key intelligence that prompted the security alert was seriously flawed. CIA analysts believed they had detected hidden terrorist messages in al-Jazeera television broadcasts that identified flights and buildings as targets. In fact, what they had seen were the equivalent of faces in clouds - random patterns all too easily over-interpreted...

More (The Guardian)

Judge weighs access to victim's PC

Wednesday, August 17, 2005 (13:55:49)
The attorney representing Michael Hernandez, the teen charged with murdering his classmate last year in the bathroom of their middle school, wants to peek into the victim's mind by scanning through the memories of the slain boy's computer...

More (Sun-Sentinel.com)
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (345 reads)

New paper: An Analytical Approach to Steganalysis

Tuesday, August 16, 2005 (14:58:55)
A new paper, "An Analytical Approach to Steganalysis" by James Wingate and Chad Davis, is now online and can be found here.

A full list of articles and papers held at Forensic Focus can be found here. New submissions are always welcome.
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (407 reads)

Software hide and seek

Friday, August 12, 2005 (11:32:51)
Delete isn't enough anymore. Consider the case of Robert Johnson, the former Newsday publisher who, prosecutors allege, used a software program called Evidence Eliminator to rid his computers of CP. Pressing ''delete'' makes files invisible, perhaps, but it doesn't make them gone. Making files gone has become a booming industry unto itself. Sales of Evidence Eliminator run in the millions of dollars each year, says Andrew Churchill, managing director of Robin Hood Software of Britain - and it's just one of more than a dozen ''file shredder'' or ''anti-forensic'' products on the market...

More (The Standard)
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (406 reads)