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Police Car Front/Rear Logging

Computer forensics discussion. Please ensure that your post is not better suited to one of the forums below (if it is, please post it there instead!)
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Police Car Front/Rear Logging

Post Posted: Wed Apr 26, 2017 5:46 pm

As our fleet of cars contains more and more vehicles with integrated front/rear cam systems for assistance systems we would like to collect this very actual video material and augment it into in-car Google Earth street view. With this we want to improve the lack of actual street view data.
You can imagine the number of cars multiplied by driven Kms (Kilometers) would gave us a 'living' layer of DIY-street view.

Did anybody already connect and collect in-car video systems and integrated this layer into Google Earth (.kml)?

Thank you.  

RolfGutmann
Senior Member
 
 
  

Re: Police Car Front/Rear Logging

Post Posted: Thu Apr 27, 2017 7:24 am

Which width are the optics of those cameras?
Which resolution?
Do you believe that you can have any meaningful image from a single lens (pointed forward) and another single lens (pointed backwards)?
Would they be somehow comparable to shots taken by - say - a dodeca2360 mounted on the roof of a car?

Maybe you need to add to the cars a dedicated (360°) camera ?

jaclaz
_________________
- In theory there is no difference between theory and practice, but in practice there is. - 

jaclaz
Senior Member
 
 
  

Re: Police Car Front/Rear Logging

Post Posted: Thu Apr 27, 2017 11:33 am

Good questions but the focus is different. Actual obstacles (e.g. constructions, redirections) are a problem in case of emergency actions (blue flash light and sirens). The resolution is not so important (but useful in case of having) as more accurate/actual video material is very helpful in general. Mounting cameras we already have a lot for different actions (speed, car-to-car-distance measuring, seat belt obligatorily) but they serve special purposes (court-related).
As many same car/model would reduce engineering of installation and data interface process equipment, the sum of cars of the fleet combined with different daytimes and routes would bring a huge amount of video material worth integrating into Google Earth (Pro, free).

A small resolution is not a problem. Actuality is very valuable for 'on duty preparation'.  

RolfGutmann
Senior Member
 
 
  

Re: Police Car Front/Rear Logging

Post Posted: Thu Apr 27, 2017 12:43 pm

I have no idea what cameras your cars mount, but from the videos seen out of most car-mounted cameras, they have a very narrow point of view, let's say at the most 90 or 100 degrees, and a rather short reach, let's say 10-15 meters at night and 30-40 (maybe 50) meters in daylight, if they are pointed forward (or backwards) the only thing I can see them as useful is recording the rear plate of the car immediately in front of the PC (Patrol Car Wink ) or the front plate of the car immediately behind it.

Which kind of obstacles are you talking of?
I mean, IF they are visible on the front camera, a second later the car will crash against them Shocked .

Or are you meaning de-routes, roads temporarily closed, diversions and the like?

How would the hypothetical system distinguish them?

In order to update a database record of any kind, there is usually a basic piece of info that is that that particular record has changed from the value already in the database, otherwise you would continuously overwrite the same value, using a gazillion of resources to change nothing in practice.

More generally, continuously recording (say) the video feed from two cameras for 24 hour of patrolling multiplied (say) 100 cars makes a nice 2*24*100=4.800 hours of video each day, how would they be processed in near real time to update the database (unless only changes are detected)?

jaclaz
_________________
- In theory there is no difference between theory and practice, but in practice there is. - 

jaclaz
Senior Member
 
 

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