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How should the law deal with strong encryption?

Computer forensics discussion. Please ensure that your post is not better suited to one of the forums below (if it is, please post it there instead!)
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jamie
Site Admin
 

How should the law deal with strong encryption?

Post Posted: Nov 02, 05 18:24

Those with an interest in the way legislation should be drafted in response to the challenges of strong encryption may enjoy Neil Barrett's latest article at silicon.com:

http://software.silicon.com/security/0,39024655,39153438,00.htm

Kind regards,

Jamie
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Jamie Morris
Forensic Focus
Web: www.forensicfocus.com
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fatrabbit
Senior Member
 

Re: How should the law deal with strong encryption?

Post Posted: Nov 02, 05 20:28

Thanks Jamie, very informative.
_________________
fatrabbit 
 
  

cblume
Member
 

Re: How should the law deal with strong encryption?

Post Posted: Nov 02, 05 22:51

I'm not familiar at all with the UK legal system ...

Are there criminal laws in place that force the defendant to produce keys, combinations, or other such access devices in the case of a physical lockdown on evidence? If so, then the concept of forcing a defendant to do the same with virtual evidence seems clear enough, and would follow the same lines.  
 
  

arashiryu
Senior Member
 

Re: How should the law deal with strong encryption?

Post Posted: Nov 03, 05 00:00

I stumbled on the information below but haven't tried it yet.

It is towards the middle of the page.

www.techpathways.com/

"Ever worry that the system you are seizing uses whole disk encryption?
Use ZeroViewTM freeware to find out.
Download your free copy of ZeroView from toorcon.techpathways.c...roview.zip today.

Burn it to a CD then pop it into the CD drive of the suspect machine and it will load into memory only and display the contents of Sector 0 allowing you to determine if whole disk encryption is employed on the suspect system. Once you know, then you can take the appropriate steps to capture and preserve the data you need. "  
 
  

yey365
Newbie
 

Re: How should the law deal with strong encryption?

Post Posted: Nov 03, 05 18:50

Under the terms of the UK RIPA Act the suspect can be compelled to divulge paswwords of face a 2 year prison sentence. Depending on what is being protected a 2 year term may be worthwhile!

Jim  
 
  

T_Oliver
Member
 

Re: How should the law deal with strong encryption?

Post Posted: Nov 07, 05 19:20

I know that was on the original plans for RIPA Jim, but are you sure it ever got implemented?  
 
  

bjgleas
Senior Member
 

Re: How should the law deal with strong encryption?

Post Posted: Nov 08, 05 07:59

- T_Oliver
I know that was on the original plans for RIPA Jim, but are you sure it ever got implemented?


It appears that the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA), was passed in the UK in July 2000. Here is a nice website detailing the act:

www.hbinfo.org/menu2/a...ents.shtml

bj  
 

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