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New to Forensics

Computer forensics discussion. Please ensure that your post is not better suited to one of the forums below (if it is, please post it there instead!)
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JWasley
Member
 

New to Forensics

Post Posted: Mar 06, 11 05:08

Good afternoon all,

I'm currently a student studying "Computer Security".

After a recent presentation given by David Sullivan, I've been debating whether to change my course to "Computer Forensics".

My question is - Are firms likely to recruit someone for forensics with a degree in "Computer Security"? My course is extremely similar to the Forensics course, it only differs in one subject.

The only reason for choosing security over forensics in the first place was due to the amount of Jobs available in that area.

Many thanks, I look forward to hearing your replies.

James  

Last edited by JWasley on Apr 03, 12 19:57; edited 1 time in total
 
  

michael556
Member
 

Re: New to Forensics

Post Posted: Mar 06, 11 05:59

Hi, I'm pretty much in the same boat, although I'm already on a CF course and it's a matter of whether to continue along that road or go for a general computing degree. Coincidentally, I've also recently attended a bloody good BCS presentation related to CF. It's a tough choice that requires a lot of research.

My understanding is forensics experts are generally being hired as independent consultants or setting up business, rather than being employed in the conventional sense. If your course is anything like the one I'm on, you could also get hired by large firms to test and improve their networks' security. If you can develop security/forensics software, that's even better.

The best advice I can give is to base your choice on genuine interest in the course modules, as I've been told it involves long hours and a bit more work than the general computing degree.  
 
  

Xennith
Senior Member
 

Re: New to Forensics

Post Posted: Mar 06, 11 06:27

General bit of life advice here fellas, I graduated with a degree in artificial intelligence about 8 years ago, I chose the subject because A. AI is cool, B. AI is fun and C. Chicks love AI. I've worked as a programmer, net admin, web monkey and am now in LE doing forensics and expanding my skill set towards security.

Do a degree because you love doing it, take jobs because they are interesting and fun. You can do pretty much anything you want with a good computer sciency degree if you develop the skills, and you're going to develop the skills in the areas you find enjoyable to work in.

Chosing a degree based primarily on the availibility of jobs is just setting yourself up for misery.  
 
  

markg43
Senior Member
 

Re: New to Forensics

Post Posted: Mar 06, 11 11:04

- Xennith
Chosing a degree based primarily on the availibility of jobs is just setting yourself up for misery.


Seconded.

I have mine in security but work as LE in Forensics. I have also been a straight IT person before that.

Many people in my lab, cops - dont have IT degrees and do forensics. I believe a more generic college degree is going to help you more in your life - that picking a pin point degree like Computer forensics. What happens if you can't get a job or do get one and decide you don't like it? If you want to get into forensics, then I think a Computer Science degree (programmer, specializing in operating systems, file systems and similar low level stuff would be very help. The actual forensic stuff - you can take week long courses in specific areas such as Internet Forensics - Windows and understand each separate area. That is what most LE guys have to do when they start forensics.  
 
  

mtbinva
Member
 

Re: New to Forensics

Post Posted: Mar 07, 11 03:18

- Xennith


Chosing a degree based primarily on the availibility of jobs is just setting yourself up for misery.


Thirded. I made that mistake years ago with engineering and CAD, because CAD was the wave of the future, and it was, but, I was miserable and HATED it. I returned back to school (I only had and AA) and got a Bachelors in Legal Studies, figuring I was going to go to law school. Needless to say, I didn't, and now am doing what I love to do.

My wife said it best, "If you love what you do and would do it for free, then it's what you should do."
_________________
Ralph Rostas, CCE, CLSP
www.cvaforensics.com

"Attitude is a little thing that goes a long way"

Winston Churchill 
 
  

jaclaz
Senior Member
 

Re: New to Forensics

Post Posted: Mar 07, 11 17:01

I like to put it in a slighly different way:
Normally there are 24 hours a day. Wink
Theoretically they should be divided into:
  • 8 hours to sleep
  • 8 hours to work
  • 8 hours for all the rest at your leisure

If you time your average day, you will find out that more likely the theory becomes in practice:
  • 6 1/2 hours sleep
  • 3 1/2 hours doing thing that you need to do anyway, like commuting, eating, procuring things, etc.
  • 8÷10 hours work
  • 4÷6 hours for "leisure"

So, you are using between 8/14 and 10/14th of the time you have actually available for something called "work".

You'd better like what you do at it. Very Happy

jaclaz
_________________
- In theory there is no difference between theory and practice, but in practice there is. - 
 
  

JWasley
Member
 

Re: New to Forensics

Post Posted: Mar 10, 11 17:03

- Xennith
Chosing a degree based primarily on the availibility of jobs is just setting yourself up for misery.


Although I agree, that's not really the situation im in at the moment. Both courses are of interest to me, and as stated in my first post - both are very similar.

I'm just wondering what the Job markets like for both courses. I'm assuming a Job related with computer security is easier to find?

James  
 

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