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Page 286

Cases confirm computer privacy is illusion

Monday, March 14, 2005 (12:07:32)
Want to communicate your thoughts privately or anonymously? Step away from the computer. Say it with flowers. Or a whisper. Or at least a pen. If you won't do it for yourself, do it for your lawyer -- the one you may need one day because of something stupid or damning or both that you blithely typed into a computer e-mail or document file on the false assumption that it was confidential or untraceable...

More (Wichita Eagle)

Should Undercover Internet Investigations be Publicized in the Media?

Sunday, March 13, 2005 (14:20:15)
Should Undercover Internet Investigations be publicized in the Media?

By Sergeant Frank Kardasz

More (New Criminologist)

Windows Security Log Encyclopedia (Press Release)

Saturday, March 12, 2005 (14:08:19)
IT managers and their staffs now have the Windows Security Log Encyclopedia, a new Windows tool for monitoring, intrusion detection and for carrying out computer forensics. The new tool covers all nine audit categories of Windows Server 2003 and illuminates the subtle, yet critical, differences between Windows Server 2003, 2000, and XP regarding security events. It documents each security event in the Windows OS, complete with analysis and commentary. This tool is freely available online at

http://www.ultimatewindowssecurity.com/encyclopedia.html

Deleted computer files never truly gone

Friday, March 11, 2005 (15:55:09)
“Whenever you delete a file, you’re really not deleting the file,” said Georges Stokes, system administrator for Air Armament Center plans and programs office. “The data is still technically there.” The information that people attempt to delete from their computers varies from user to user said Special Agent Robert Renko, Defense Computer Forensics Laboratory director of operations...


More (Air Force Link)

Indian certificate course on cyber crime

Thursday, March 10, 2005 (13:14:27)
The Indian Society of Criminology (ISC) in coordination with Valliant CISSTech is to offer certificate courses on Cyber Forensics and Penetration Testing. Announcing this at a press meet in Chennai yesterday, R Thilagaraj, secretary, ISC and head of the department of Criminology, University of Madras, said the course was being introduced with a view to meeting the shortage of trained and validated professionals who would help fight cyber crimes and assist in assessing and validating the security architecture of users of networked information system. He added that the programme was designed to meet Indian market needs...

More (News Today)

Tracking PCs anywhere on the Net

Wednesday, March 09, 2005 (18:00:29)
A University of California researcher, Tadayoshi Kohno, says he has found a way to identify computer hardware remotely, a technique that could potentially unmask anonymous Web surfers by bypassing some common security techniques. In his paper Kohno mentioned possible forensics applications, saying that investigators could use his techniques "to argue whether a given laptop was connected to the Internet from a given access location."

More (News.com)

Testifying in a Computer Crimes Case

Wednesday, March 09, 2005 (12:08:00)
As an IT professional and working network administrator, you may find yourself called upon to testify as a victim or witness (i.e., a representative of a company whose network is victimized) in a computer-related crime. Another possibility is that you might someday want to use your technical expertise to become a professional expert witness in computer-related cases. In this article, we examine the basics of testifying in either capacity in a case involving computer crimes, and how you can move into the lucrative field of computer forensics, on either a full- or part-time basis...

More (WindowsSecurity.com)

The value of sleuthing skills in IT security

Tuesday, March 08, 2005 (13:44:48)
In criminal investigations, forensic evidence is often used to prove that a person was at a particular place at a certain time, or even to show an irrefutable connection with a crime that has been committed. In the world of IT, network forensics can be used to identify how communications assets are being affected by data theft committed by internal sources, to track security exploits, and to spot violations of corporate security policies...

More (IT-Analysis.com)

Are you sitting next to a criminal?

Monday, March 07, 2005 (13:03:03)
Computer criminals could be working next to you every day, yet be stealing from your business. A survey carried out on 201 companies by the National High Tech Crime Unit, found that the impact of hi-tech crime in 2003 reached an estimated £195 million. Acts of data theft and sabotage were usually found to be internally originated. More worryingly, over one third of fraud acts involved company employees...

More (Bios)

Computer sleuths dig deep to solve crimes

Saturday, March 05, 2005 (13:10:48)
John Mallery says his current job as a computer forensic expert has some parallels to his former calling as a comedian, juggler and knife thrower. "I've thrown knives around my wife. If I'm not in shape and I don't practice, I put her at risk," he said. "If I'm a forensic examiner and I don't keep up with my skills, bad guys get away."

More (CNN)