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Page 320

Cybercrime Summit, Feb 27 - Mar 3, 2006

Saturday, February 25, 2006 (00:44:08)
Originally known as the Southeast Cyber Crime Summit, the new and improved CyberCrime Summit starts its fourth year in existence. This is due to the growth and realization that the summit reaches beyond the Southeastern U.S. The CyberCrime Summit attracts attendees from all over the world. Last year in addition to the U.S. and many Northern European attendees, some of the farthest attendees came from Italy, and Colombia, South America.

Registration: $249.00

More
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (1026 reads)

UK rapped on data retention law

Friday, February 24, 2006 (18:22:05)
Britain's net industry has named the UK presidency of the EU as its villain of the year. The Internet Service Providers' Association (Ispa) singled out the UK for its role in pushing for Europe-wide data retention laws. The laws, requiring telecom operators to store phone and internet data to help fight terrorism, received its final go-ahead earlier this week...

More (BBC)
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (2460 reads)

Data Retention Directive endorsed by Ministers

Friday, February 24, 2006 (01:18:59)
The controversial Data Retention Directive received its final seal of approval on Tuesday, when Ministers at the Justice and Home Affairs Council adopted the Directive with a qualified majority. Irish and Slovak Ministers voted against the measure. In general terms, the Directive aims to harmonise Member States' provisions relating to the retention of communications data, in order to ensure that the data, which can identify the caller, the time and the means of communication, is available for the purpose of the investigation, detection and prosecution of serious crime. The Directive is not concerned with the content of the communications...

More (Out-Law.com)

Nowhere to hide

Thursday, February 23, 2006 (22:17:39)
Be careful what you try to deny is the message from Ed Wilding, particularly if files retrieved from electronic devices have your name all over them. The forensic investigation of data held on computers, laptops, cellular telephones, PDAs and other data processing and storage devices is a valuable resource in litigation and for dispute resolution...

More (Legal IT)

Washington Post fails to protect Deep Throat from metadata!

Wednesday, February 22, 2006 (22:32:45)
The Washington Post, famous for hiding the name of its Deep Throat source during the Watergate scandal, might have accidentally revealed the name of one of its sources in a less important yarn about a hacker...the article ran a doctored picture of 0x80 which when the people at Slashdot had a look at the metadata in the pic it revealed 0x80 lived in the town of Roland, population 2,842...

More (the Inquirer)
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (961 reads)

Are non technical juries keeping criminals at large?

Wednesday, February 22, 2006 (20:32:47)
In England and Wales the only qualifications required of a jury member to be eligible to appear in a court of law are that they are registered on the electoral roll, aged between 18 and 70 and have lived in the UK for at least 5 years. Jurors are not required to hold any professional qualifications and there are to date no technical jury qualification guidelines for cases involving complex computer data. Where does that leave us then, when vital yet highly complicated technical information needs to be communicated and thoroughly understood in order to fairly evaluate a case? Let’s take a look at the evidence…

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  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (1910 reads)

Forensic experts may testify that CA executives erased data

Tuesday, February 21, 2006 (17:50:29)
Former CA chairman and chief executive Sanjay Kumar and another CA executive obstructed justice by attempting to erase evidence from computers after the federal government began investigating accounting fraud at the software company, prosecutors say in a letter to defense attorneys...

More (Newsday.com)
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (838 reads)

Without a trace: Documents and deleted data

Monday, February 20, 2006 (21:07:08)
Documents tend to collect hidden data, which takes two forms. One is metadata, or data about a document, which is appended by the program, often unnoticed by the user. Then there’s data that was part of the original document but somehow has been rendered invisible to the average user. Knowing how to find both types of hidden data is critical to getting rid of it...

More (GCN)
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (838 reads)

Guidance - The Next Generation of Write Block Technologies

Sunday, February 19, 2006 (19:19:07)
On February 22nd, Guidance Software will host an online seminar that will explore the next generation of write block technologies. One of the first rules taught in computer investigations is to assure that the original media is not altered, and that the methods used to create forensic quality copies of the media and static data assure that the integrity of the original is maintained. For this reason, the use of write blocking / prevention mechanisms has always been suggested for "media imaging," as well as thorough testing beforehand to assure that the mechanism works without fail...

Link
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (4222 reads)

Anonymity on a Disc

Sunday, February 19, 2006 (19:12:24)
To many privacy geeks, it's the holy grail -- a totally anonymous and secure computer so easy to use you can hand it to your grandmother and send her off on her own to the local Starbucks. That was the guiding principle for the members of kaos.theory security research when they set out to put a secure crypto-heavy operating systems on a bootable CD: a disc that would offer the masses the same level of privacy available to security professionals, but with an easy user interface...

More (Wired)
  • Posted by: jamie
  • Topic: News
  • Score: 0 / 5
  • (1627 reads)